Physics Events

  • Monday, November 26, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “Stringy ER=EPR”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Daniel Jafferis, Harvard University

    Description:  

  • Tuesday, November 27, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “From the Table-Top to the Cosmos: Searching High and Low for Dark Matter”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Hongwan Liu, MIT

    Description: In this talk, I will explore two recent developments in the search for dark matter. First, I will discuss how the 21-cm global signal measurement constrains the potential impact of dark matter annihilation/decay on the thermal history of the universe. I will also explain how to accurately compute such modifications to the baryon temperature in the early universe using a soon-to-be-released public code called DarkHistory. Second, I will discuss the Axion Detection with Birefringent Cavities (ADBC) experiment, which aims to observe rotations induced by axion dark matter in the polarization of light using optical interferometry techniques.

  • Wednesday, November 28, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Tom Rudelius, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description:  

  • Thursday, November 29, 2018
    Princeton University Department of Physics Donald R. Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “The Chiral Anomaly in Dirac Semimetals”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Nai Phuan Ong, Princeton University

    Description: I will talk about recent experiments on the chiral anomaly in Dirac semimetals. In field theory, Dirac fermions of zero mass must segregate into left- and right-handed populations that do not ever mix. In this limit, chiral symmetry (handedness) is a global symmetry of the Lagrangian. However, quantum effects induced by coupling to a vector gauge field kill the symmetry. This is known as the chiral (or axial) anomaly. The first example appeared (1968) in the decay of neutral pions into 2 photons (the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly). Since then, anomalies have been implicated in many important problems, e.g. the $U(1)_A$ problem, renormalizability of the electroweak theory, and the fermion-doubling problem in lattice QCD. It is also directly related to the Atiyah-Singer index theorem. In 1983, Nielsen and Ninomiya predicted that the chiral anomaly should be observable as well in bulk semimetals that feature protected 3D Dirac cones. Breaking of time-reversal invariance in a magnetic field B converts the Dirac electrons in a semimetal to Weyl fermions. The chiral nature of the Weyl fermions become manifest in the lowest Landau level (in intense B). An electric field applied parallel to B shifts the left and right-moving branches to produce an axial current. I will describe experiments on $Na_3Bi$ and GdPtBi which show the dramatic emergence of the anomaly, and focus on issues peculiar to the anomaly in crystals. I will describe a litmus test that sharply distinguishes this quantum effect from (classical) artifacts caused by current jetting.
    https://phy.princeton.edu/events/donald-r-hamilton-colloquium-series

  • Friday, November 30, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Anna Karlsson, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description:  

  • Monday, December 3, 2018
    PCTS Workshop
    “Fracton Phases of Matter and Topologial Crystalline Order”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Speaker(s): http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pcts/Fracton2018/posterFracton.pdf
    Note: Registration is now open!

    Description: Program Organizers: Fiona Burnell, Biao Lian, Abhinav Prem, Shivaji Sondhi, and Yizhi You
    Topological quantum phases of matter remain one of the most exciting playgrounds for exploring the interplay between strong correlations, symmetry, and topology in many-body quantum systems. Recently, there has been growing interest in novel quantum phases of matterso-called fracton phases. These systems extend and challenge our existing notions of topological order and have attracted broad interdisciplinary interest, lying at the intersection of multiple fields including topological order, higher rank gauge theories, gravity, quantum information, and elastic descriptions of soft matter. We expect that this workshop will bring together leading experts from these various communities, with the primary aim being the stimulation of discussions and promotion of cross-disciplinary interactions amongst the participants.

    http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pcts/Fracton2018/fracton2018.html

     
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScMhkcd841npmUAc7WaBBL9UeUfAfSdSe6JTet2CljdGN9Isw/viewform

  • Tuesday, December 4, 2018
    Qubit Workshop
    “Quantum Information and the Structure of Spacetime”

    Location: Wolfensohn Hall
    Time: 8:00 AM

    Description: Please Note: This workshop is not open to the general public, but only to active researchers.

    This workshop will focus on quantum aspects of black holes, focusing on applying ideas from quantum information theory.

    This meeting is sponsored by the It from Qubit collaboration and is followed by the collaboration meeting in New York City.

    Deadline to Register:
    Wednesday, November 28, 2018
    All participants must register. https://www.sns.ias.edu/quantum-information-workshop-2018/registration
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/quantum-information-workshop-2018

  • Tuesday, December 4, 2018
    PCTS Workshop
    “Fracton Phases of Matter and Topologial Crystalline Order”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Speaker(s): http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pcts/Fracton2018/posterFracton.pdf
    Note: Registration is now open!

    Description: Program Organizers: Fiona Burnell, Biao Lian, Abhinav Prem, Shivaji Sondhi, and Yizhi You
    Topological quantum phases of matter remain one of the most exciting playgrounds for exploring the interplay between strong correlations, symmetry, and topology in many-body quantum systems. Recently, there has been growing interest in novel quantum phases of matterso-called fracton phases. These systems extend and challenge our existing notions of topological order and have attracted broad interdisciplinary interest, lying at the intersection of multiple fields including topological order, higher rank gauge theories, gravity, quantum information, and elastic descriptions of soft matter. We expect that this workshop will bring together leading experts from these various communities, with the primary aim being the stimulation of discussions and promotion of cross-disciplinary interactions amongst the participants.

    http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pcts/Fracton2018/fracton2018.html

     
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScMhkcd841npmUAc7WaBBL9UeUfAfSdSe6JTet2CljdGN9Isw/viewform

  • Wednesday, December 5, 2018
    Qubit Workshop
    “Quantum Information and the Structure of Spacetime”

    Location: Wolfensohn Hall (Bloomberg Hall 4:00 - 6:00 pm)
    Time: 8:00 AM

    Description: Please Note: This workshop is not open to the general public, but only to active researchers.

    This workshop will focus on quantum aspects of black holes, focusing on applying ideas from quantum information theory.

    This meeting is sponsored by the It from Qubit collaboration and is followed by the collaboration meeting in New York City.

    Deadline to Register:
    Wednesday, November 28, 2018
    All participants must register. https://www.sns.ias.edu/quantum-information-workshop-2018/registration
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/quantum-information-workshop-2018

  • Wednesday, December 5, 2018
    PCTS Workshop
    “Fracton Phases of Matter and Topologial Crystalline Order”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Speaker(s): http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pcts/Fracton2018/posterFracton.pdf
    Note: Registration is now open!

    Description: Program Organizers: Fiona Burnell, Biao Lian, Abhinav Prem, Shivaji Sondhi, and Yizhi You
    Topological quantum phases of matter remain one of the most exciting playgrounds for exploring the interplay between strong correlations, symmetry, and topology in many-body quantum systems. Recently, there has been growing interest in novel quantum phases of matterso-called fracton phases. These systems extend and challenge our existing notions of topological order and have attracted broad interdisciplinary interest, lying at the intersection of multiple fields including topological order, higher rank gauge theories, gravity, quantum information, and elastic descriptions of soft matter. We expect that this workshop will bring together leading experts from these various communities, with the primary aim being the stimulation of discussions and promotion of cross-disciplinary interactions amongst the participants.

    http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pcts/Fracton2018/fracton2018.html

     
    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScMhkcd841npmUAc7WaBBL9UeUfAfSdSe6JTet2CljdGN9Isw/viewform

  • Friday, December 7, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA, TBA

  • Monday, December 10, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Erich Poppitz, University of Toronto

  • Wednesday, December 12, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): TBA

    Description:  

  • Friday, December 14, 2018
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Juven Wang, Member, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description:  

  • Wednesday, December 19, 2018
    Physics Group Meeting
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Hall Physics Library
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Nima Arkani-Hamed, Faculty, School of Natural Sciences, IAS

    Description:  

  • Monday, January 14, 2019
    PCTS Workshop
    “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Fourth Floor, Room 407, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Note: Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf30X77lY09RVrDcsx98KJJkRoy3akoR5TCQESS101MoT2Y5g/viewform

    Description: Dark matter research is undergoing a paradigm shift. Over the last few years, many novel theories have been proposed that challenge the standard assumptions made about dark matter. At the same time, new observations and simulation results are providing valuable clues regarding the most fruitful directions moving forward.

    The “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter 2019” workshop at Princeton University attempts to bridge the gap between communities working on non-standard solutions to the dark matter problem. Plenary talks on theory, observations and simulations will be structured into a three day schedule that will provide a broad overview of research avenues of this type. The workshop aims to promote conversations between research communities with ample time for open discussion.

    Organizing committee:
    Oren Slone - oslone@princeton.edu
    Mariangela Lisanti - mlistanti@princeton.edu
    Tomer Volansky - tomerv@post.tau.ac.il
    http://pcts.princeton.edu/pcts/current_future_programs.html

  • Tuesday, January 15, 2019
    PCTS Workshop
    “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Fourth Floor, Room 407, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Note: Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf30X77lY09RVrDcsx98KJJkRoy3akoR5TCQESS101MoT2Y5g/viewform

    Description: Dark matter research is undergoing a paradigm shift. Over the last few years, many novel theories have been proposed that challenge the standard assumptions made about dark matter. At the same time, new observations and simulation results are providing valuable clues regarding the most fruitful directions moving forward.

    The “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter 2019” workshop at Princeton University attempts to bridge the gap between communities working on non-standard solutions to the dark matter problem. Plenary talks on theory, observations and simulations will be structured into a three day schedule that will provide a broad overview of research avenues of this type. The workshop aims to promote conversations between research communities with ample time for open discussion.

    Organizing committee:
    Oren Slone - oslone@princeton.edu
    Mariangela Lisanti - mlistanti@princeton.edu
    Tomer Volansky - tomerv@post.tau.ac.il
    http://pcts.princeton.edu/pcts/current_future_programs.html

  • Tuesday, January 15, 2019
    PCTS Workshop
    “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Fourth Floor, Room 407, PCTS Seminar Room
    Time: 8:30 AM
    Note: Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf30X77lY09RVrDcsx98KJJkRoy3akoR5TCQESS101MoT2Y5g/viewform

    Description: Dark matter research is undergoing a paradigm shift. Over the last few years, many novel theories have been proposed that challenge the standard assumptions made about dark matter. At the same time, new observations and simulation results are providing valuable clues regarding the most fruitful directions moving forward.

    The “Novel Ideas for Dark Matter 2019” workshop at Princeton University attempts to bridge the gap between communities working on non-standard solutions to the dark matter problem. Plenary talks on theory, observations and simulations will be structured into a three day schedule that will provide a broad overview of research avenues of this type. The workshop aims to promote conversations between research communities with ample time for open discussion.

    Organizing committee:
    Oren Slone - oslone@princeton.edu
    Mariangela Lisanti - mlistanti@princeton.edu
    Tomer Volansky - tomerv@post.tau.ac.il
    http://pcts.princeton.edu/pcts/current_future_programs.html