Astrophysics Events

  • Monday, September 28, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “FLEET: A Redshift-Agnostic Machine Learning Pipeline to Rapidly Identify Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernovae”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: Sebastian Gomez, Harvard University
    Note:

    Discussion paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/2009.01853



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, September 28, 2020
    Princeton University Exoplanet Discussion Group
    “Protoplanetary Disks and Clouds in Substellar Atmospheres: Insights from Microphysics”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 12:15 PM
    Speaker(s): Diana Powell, University of California Santa Cruz
    Note:

    Josh Winn is the organizer.



    Description:

    In this talk, I will provide evidence that protoplanetary disks are more than an order of magnitude more massive than previously appreciated, that the detailed properties of clouds shape observations of substellar atmospheres, and that the physics of modeling clouds gives a new understanding of the solid content in protoplanetary disks. Clouds on extrasolar worlds are seemingly abundant and interfere with observations; however, little is known about their properties. In our modeling, we predict cloud properties from first principles and investigate how the interesting observational properties of hot Jupiters and brown dwarfs can be explained by clouds. Next, I will report on a new set of models that reconcile theory with observations of protoplanetary disks and create a new set of initial conditions for planet formation models. The total mass available in protoplanetary disks is a critical initial condition for understanding planet formation; however, the surface densities of protoplanetary disks still remain largely unconstrained due to uncertainties in the dust-to-gas ratio and CO abundance. I make use of recent resolved multiwavelength observations of disks in the millimeter to constrain the aerodynamic properties of dust grains to infer the total disk mass without an assumed dust opacity or tracer-to-H2 ratio. Finally, I will present new work that combines the microphysics of cloud formation in planetary atmospheres and our new models of protoplanetary disks to show that the observed depletion of CO in well-studied disks is consistent with freeze-out processes and that the variable CO depletion observed in disks can be explained by the processes of freeze-out and particle drift.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/extrasolar-planets

  • Monday, September 28, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Speaker 1: Emmanuel Schaan | Speaker 2: Brandon Hensley, Speaker 1: Princeton University | Speaker 2: Princeton University
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Monday, September 28, 2020
    Princeton University Gravity Initiative Lunch
    “Neutron star mergers: On the impact of high spins in multi-messenger gravitational wave events”

    Location: via ZOOM
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Elias Most, Princeton University; Member, School of Natural Sciences

    Description:

    Since the first detection of a gravitational wave event of the merger of two neutron stars in 2017, two more detections in the neutron star mass range have been announced earlier this year. The first one, GW190425, involved an unusually massive neutron star, the second one, GW190814, had a companion in the lower mass gap that could either have been the heaviest neutron star or the lightest black hole ever observed. One of the uncertainties in those detections is allowing for the possibility of having high initial spins before the merger.  

    In this talk, I will discuss the potential observational impact of the presence of high spins in the inspiral. In particular, I will show what effect high spins can have on the emission of – yet to be observed – electromagnetic precursors and on the mass ejected dynamically during the merger process.

    This will be followed by the presentation of a new method to place limits on high spins and small mass ratios in mergers involving a very massive neutron star, such as GW190425.

    Finally, I will comment on potential implications for the equation of state, in case the secondary in GW190814 was (once) a neutron star. Following up on the possibility of having low mass black holes in the lower mass gap, I will present the results of an on-going study of near equal mass black hole-neutron star mergers. In particular, I will focus on the impact of initial black hole spin on the viability for electromagnetic counterparts.


    https://gravity.princeton.edu/

  • Tuesday, September 29, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Joint Astrophysics Colloquium
    “Decoding Chemical Evolution and Nucleosynthesis ”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): David Weinberg, Ohio State University; Member, School of Natural Sciences

    Description:

    I will discuss insights from analytic and numerical models of galactic chemical evolution and observations of Milky Way elemental abundances from the SDSS APOGEE survey. Under generic model assumptions, abundances and abundance ratios approach an equilibrium in which element production from nucleosynthesis is balanced by element depletion from star formation and outflows. The efficiency of outflows required to reproduce observed abundances is strongly degenerate with the uncertain overall scale of IMF-averaged supernova yields. APOGEE observations show that the distributions of stars in (alpha,iron,age)-space change steadily across the Milky Way disk, with features that suggest radial migration of stars and complexity in the Galactic star formation history. However, the median trends of abundance ratios are remarkably stable throughout the disk and bulge, which allows these trends to provide empirical constraints on supernova nucleosynthesis that are insensitive to uncertainties in other aspects of chemical evolution. Constraining the absolute scale of IMF-averaged yields is challenging; the high observed deuterium abundance in the local ISM indirectly suggests a high yield scale, implying that most massive stars explode rather than collapse to black holes.


    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/joint-iaspu-astrophysics-colloquium

  • Tuesday, September 29, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 12:30 PM

  • Tuesday, September 29, 2020
    Princeton University Joint Physics and Astrophysics Seminar Series on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion
    “Racial Diversity and Underrepresentation in STEM”

    Location: Virtual Event via Zoom
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Shawn Maxam, Princeton University

    Description:

    We are pleased to announce our Seminar Series on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, which is jointly hosted by the Physics and Astrophysics departments.

    This session will provide an introductory overview of the underrepresentation of racial minorities in STEM disciplines specifically the natural sciences. Best practices and strategies to enhance racial diversity and representation will be discussed.

    • Overview of racial demographic data across higher education landscape
    • Discussion of impacts of underrepresentation on research and teaching mission
    • Review of best practices and strategies to enhance racial diversity and representation
    • Q/A and open discussion

    Shawn Maxam serves as Senior Associate Director for Institutional Diversity and Inclusion in the Office of the Provost. In this role, he leads strategic partnerships and projects associated with campus climate, academic departments, data analysis, and history and sense of place, among others. Shawn joined the Provost Office in 2016 as an Assistant Director. He previously served as the Prevention Coordinator for Men’s Initiatives in Princeton’s University Health Services from 2014 to 2016. Shawn is deeply committed to board service and educational non profits. He serves as a trustee for the Princeton Blairstown Center and the Lawrence Township Education Fund. Shawn earned his BFA from Long Island University and two Masters degrees from Bryn Mawr College in Social Service and Law Social Policy.



  • Wednesday, September 30, 2020
    University of Pennsylvania Astronomy Seminar
    “Cosmology and Astrophysics with Intensity Mapping”

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 2:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Yun-Ting Cheng, California Institute of Technology

    Description:

    Intensity mapping has emerged as a promising tool to probe the high-redshift universe by measuring the aggregate emission without resolving individual sources, complementing the information from conventional galaxy surveys. In this talk, I will discuss my works on a range of cosmological / astrophysical applications of intensity mapping. First, I will introduce a theoretical framework to quantify the performance of large-scale structure probes (intensity mapping and galaxy survey),  which can serve as a tool to optimize the design for future cosmological surveys. Next, I will talk about line intensity mapping, which probes the 3D large-scale structure by mapping the emission of a particular spectrum line. Then, I will describe my latest work on  CIBER, a sounding rocket experiment designed to probe the near-IR extragalactic background light (EBL). We use stacking analysis with CIBER data to study intra-halo light, the emission from the stars tidally stripped from their parent galaxies which ultimately reside in the surrounding dark matter halo. Finally, I will conclude with the upcoming all-sky spectral survey, SPHEREx, and show the possibility to constrain the (redshift dependent) EBL spectrum by cross-correlating SPHEREx with spectroscopic galaxy catalogs.


    http://www.physics.upenn.edu/events/astro-seminars

  • Thursday, October 1, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar
    “Hubble Views of Massive Clusters and Giant Arcs Discovered by Planck”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Brenda Frye, University of Arizona; Member, School of Natural Sciences

    Description:

     

    We have undertaken a novel census of red sources identified by their rest-frame far infrared colors using Planck and Herschel telescopes, and not by the Sunyaev-Z'eldovich effect (SZE). The vast majority of sources are high-redshift galaxy overdensity candidates. These structures have high total measured star formation rates of ~1000 solar masses per year and show tentative evidence for low molecular gas masses, as expected for a population nearing the end of an active epoch of star formation. On the other hand, a small minority of sources are dusty star forming galaxies (DSFGs) which are individually-detected by Planck as a result of strong lensing by massive foreground structures. We obtained Hubble Space Telescope WFC3-IR imaging in the fields of six of these classical giant arcs. We focus on one cluster lens that stands out for its a high mass and high dark-matter-density, while at the same time its low X-ray luminosity unremarkable Planck SZE decrement. We discuss the possibility that this double cluster may be intercepted in a relatively rare "pre-core" initial infall state. As a result of its unusual physical properties, this cluster will be observed in guaranteed time using the JWST.


    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/astrophysics-seminars

  • Thursday, October 1, 2020
    Princeton University Thunch Talk
    “Rethinking the Nature of Interstellar Dust”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Brandon Hensley, Princeton University
    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/Thunch

  • Friday, October 2, 2020
    Princeton University Astroplasmas Seminar
    “A Unified Picture of Fast Radio Bursts”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Wenbin Lu, California Institute of Technology

    Description: Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are short duration (~ms), very bright, radio transients. Their detection a decade ago was a major unexpected discovery in astronomy in decades. Hunting for FRBs and measuring their physical properties have become one of the leading scientific goals in astronomy. This effort has led to a rapidly growing sample with extremely diverse properties in luminosity ($10^{38}$ to $10^{45}$ erg/s), duration (0.1 ms to 10 ms), and repetition rate (some objects have multiple bursts in an hour and many just one burst in a few years). I will present a study of their cosmological volumetric rate density and provide evidence that these bursts all belong to the same class of transients --- most likely all are repeaters. According to my model, disturbances close to the surface of a magnetar launch Alfven waves into the magnetosphere, which propagate to a distance of a few tens of neutron star radii and then produce coherent radio emission. The coincident hard X-rays associated with the Galactic FRB 200428 can be understood in this scenario. This model provides a unified picture for weak Galactic FRBs as well as the bright bursts seen at cosmological distances. If time allows, the polarization properties of FRBs will also be addressed.
    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/astroplasmas

  • Friday, October 2, 2020
    Princeton University HSC Group Discussion
    “General Discussion”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 3:00 PM
    Note:

    For the Zoom link, contact Yusra AlSayyad <yusra AT astro.princeton.edu>, Andrina Nicola <anicola AT astro.princeton.edu>, or Michael Strauss <strauss AT astro.princeton.edu>.



  • Monday, October 5, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “First results from SMAUG: The need for preventative stellar feedback and improved baryon cycling in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: Viraj Pandya, University of California Santa Cruz
    Note:

    Discussion paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.16317



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, October 5, 2020
    Princeton University Gravity Initiative Lunch
    “TBA”

    Location: via ZOOM
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Matthew Heydeman, Princeton University; Member, School of Natural Sciences
    https://gravity.princeton.edu/

  • Monday, October 5, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Yuguang Chen, California Institute of Technology
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Tuesday, October 6, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Joint Astrophysics Colloquium
    “SRG/eRosita: X-ray map of the whole sky. Some results of the first all-sky survey and plans for the future”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Rashid Sunyaev, Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics

    Description:

    Spektr-RG spacecraft with Russian (ART-XC) and German (eRosita) X-Ray telescopes was launched on July 13th of 2019 from Baykonur. During the flight to the L2 point of the Sun-Earth system, SRG performed calibrations and detailed long duration Performance Verification (PV) observations of more than a dozen of targets. Starting in the middle of December 2019, the SRG Observatory scanned the whole sky in half a year and discovered more than a million point X-Ray sources, mainly AGNs and QSOs, stars with hot and bright coronae, and more than 16 thousand clusters of galaxies. SRG provided the X-Ray map of the whole sky in hard and soft bands, which is now the best among existing. It reveals a lot of information about the distribution of absorbing gas in the Milky Way and provides a beautiful image of the North Polar Spur and similar bright emitting feature on another side from the Central Part of the Galaxy. I plan to describe the Observatory plans for the future and to demonstrate several exciting results from the PV phase observations as well as from the second all-sky survey which is ongoing.


    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/joint-iaspu-astrophysics-colloquium

  • Tuesday, October 6, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 12:30 PM

  • Wednesday, October 7, 2020
    University of Pennsylvania Astronomy Seminar
    “In Search Of: Failed Supernovae”

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 2:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Chris Kochanek , Ohio State University
    http://www.physics.upenn.edu/events/astro-seminars

  • Thursday, October 8, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Andrei Beloborodov, Columbia University
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/astrophysics-seminars

  • Monday, October 12, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “TBA”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: Harshil Kamdar , Harvard University
    Note:

    Discussion paper: TBA



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, October 12, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Xiao Fang, University of Arizona
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Tuesday, October 13, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Joint Astrophysics Colloquium
    “Origins of Structure in Inner Planetary Systems”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Ruth Murray-Clay, University of California, Santa Cruz

    Description:

    Why do many stars host close-in chains of super-Earths?  Why are eccentric gas giants found in some inner planetary systems?  What determines which of these outcomes will occur around a particular star?  I will present a possible framework for answering these questions that appeals to the “flow isolation mass,” a limiting mass for pebble accretion.  Flow isolation occurs when small particles, coupled to the gas, are pulled around a growing planet along gas streamlines.  Its consequences are highly dependent on the particle sizes present in the planet’s natal disk.  In inner planetary systems, if fragmentation limits “pebble” sizes to Stokes numbers approaching one, then flow isolation yields limiting masses similar in scale to the thermal mass, comparable to the distinct “pebble isolation mass.”  At larger orbital separations or if Stokes numbers are smaller, these processes diverge.  I will present work showing that flow isolation can yield systems of super-Earths comparable to those observed.  I will then discuss how a giant impact phase for giant planets results if multiple gas giants are instead produced in inner planetary systems, yielding a population of gas giants that well matches the data and in particular explaining why higher-mass giants are more likely to have high eccentricities.  Finally, I will connect these two ideas to demonstrate that for a reasonable distribution of disk parameters, we can reproduce the relative frequency of super-Earth and gas giant systems.


    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/joint-iaspu-astrophysics-colloquium

  • Tuesday, October 13, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 12:30 PM

  • Wednesday, October 14, 2020
    Princeton Gravity Initiative - PCTS Workshop
    “Exploring Supermassive Black Holes”

    Location: via ZOOM
    Time: 8:30 AM

    Description:

    Registration is open

    Speakers:

    • Fabio Antonini, Cardiff University
    • Manuela Campanelli, RIT
    • Julie Comerford, University of Colorado-Boulder
    • Suvi Gezari, University of Maryland
    • Steffan Gillessen, MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE (MPE)
    • Yuri Levin, Columbia University and Flat Iron Institute, CCA
    • Xin Liu, University of Illinois
    • Chung-Pei Ma, UC Berkeley
    • Brian Metzger, Columbia university
    • Diego Munoz, Northwestern University (CIERA)
    • Smadar Naoz, UCLA
    • Michael Tremmel, Yale
    • Karina Voggel, Strasbourg Observatory, France
    • Marta Volonteri, Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris (IAP)

    Organizing committee:
    Fani Dosopoulou, Jeremy Goodman, Jenny Greene, and James Stone


    https://phy.princeton.edu/events/princeton-gravity-initiative-pcts-workshop-exploring-supermassive-black-holes-0

  • Thursday, October 15, 2020
    Princeton Gravity Initiative - PCTS Workshop
    “Exploring Supermassive Black Holes”

    Location: via ZOOM
    Time: 8:30 AM

    Description:

    Registration is open

    Speakers:

    • Fabio Antonini, Cardiff University
    • Manuela Campanelli, RIT
    • Julie Comerford, University of Colorado-Boulder
    • Suvi Gezari, University of Maryland
    • Steffan Gillessen, MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE (MPE)
    • Yuri Levin, Columbia University and Flat Iron Institute, CCA
    • Xin Liu, University of Illinois
    • Chung-Pei Ma, UC Berkeley
    • Brian Metzger, Columbia university
    • Diego Munoz, Northwestern University (CIERA)
    • Smadar Naoz, UCLA
    • Michael Tremmel, Yale
    • Karina Voggel, Strasbourg Observatory, France
    • Marta Volonteri, Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris (IAP)

    Organizing committee:
    Fani Dosopoulou, Jeremy Goodman, Jenny Greene, and James Stone


    https://phy.princeton.edu/events/princeton-gravity-initiative-pcts-workshop-exploring-supermassive-black-holes-0

  • Thursday, October 15, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar
    “Binary star evolution: a multi-wavelength, multi-messenger puzzle”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Katelyn Breivik, Flatiron Institute

    Description:

    Recent observations of binary black hole and binary neutron star mergers have ignited interest in the formation and evolution of compact-object binary systems. However, by the time a compact-object binary merges and produces gravitational-wave/electromagnetic signals we can observe, much of the evolutionary history of the stellar progenitors is washed away. By combining binary population synthesis simulations with observations, we can constrain the uncertain processes that govern the evolution of binary stars from zero age main sequence through to compact object formation. In this talk I will introduce an openly developed population synthesis code: COSMIC and highlight some recent work which explores how to combine binary population simulations with future data from gravitational wave and electromagnetic surveys to constrain the formation and evolution of compact-object binaries.


    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/astrophysics-seminars

  • Friday, October 16, 2020
    Princeton Gravity Initiative - PCTS Workshop
    “Exploring Supermassive Black Holes”

    Location: via ZOOM
    Time: 8:30 AM

    Description:

    Registration is open

    Speakers:

    • Fabio Antonini, Cardiff University
    • Manuela Campanelli, RIT
    • Julie Comerford, University of Colorado-Boulder
    • Suvi Gezari, University of Maryland
    • Steffan Gillessen, MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE (MPE)
    • Yuri Levin, Columbia University and Flat Iron Institute, CCA
    • Xin Liu, University of Illinois
    • Chung-Pei Ma, UC Berkeley
    • Brian Metzger, Columbia university
    • Diego Munoz, Northwestern University (CIERA)
    • Smadar Naoz, UCLA
    • Michael Tremmel, Yale
    • Karina Voggel, Strasbourg Observatory, France
    • Marta Volonteri, Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris (IAP)

    Organizing committee:
    Fani Dosopoulou, Jeremy Goodman, Jenny Greene, and James Stone


    https://phy.princeton.edu/events/princeton-gravity-initiative-pcts-workshop-exploring-supermassive-black-holes-0

  • Monday, October 19, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “TBA”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: TBA
    Note:

    Discussion paper: TBA



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, October 19, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Chun-Hao To, Stanford University
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Monday, October 19, 2020
    Princeton University Gravity Initiative Lunch
    “TBA”

    Location: via ZOOM
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Lia Medeiros, Member, School of Natural Sciences
    https://gravity.princeton.edu/

  • Wednesday, October 21, 2020
    Rutgers University Physics/Astronomy Colloquium
    “Tests of General Relativity with Black Hole Shadows”

    Location: Virtual
    Time: 3:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Dimitrios Psaltis, University of Arizona
    Note:

    Please contact administrative assistant Lisa Rivera (lrivera at physics.rutgers.edu) with questions regarding speakers schedule and zoom settings. Questions about the colloquium schedule should be addressed to Prof. Piers Coleman (pcoleman at physics.rutgers.edu).



    Description:

    The imaging of black-hole shadows with the Event Horizon Telescope has opened a new window into the strong-field spacetimes of these extreme astrophysical objects. I will first discuss the technological and theoretical advances that led to the first image of the black hole in the M87 galaxy. I will describe how this observation allows us to perform new tests of General Relativity. I will explore the connection of the new results to tests of gravity with other astrophysical and cosmological probes. I will conclude with a prognosis on what ground-based observations of shadows can tell us about black-hole metrics and the underlying theory of gravity.

    Zoom Link: https://rutgers.zoom.us/j/97747524523?pwd=ei9yOGh1WWg4VVJWcDVDVTdJVjNKdz09

    Meeting ID: 977 4752 4523
    Passcode: 817908

     


    https://physics.rutgers.edu/events/colloquium/

  • Thursday, October 22, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Elisabeth Krause, University of Arizona
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/astrophysics-seminars

  • Monday, October 26, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “TBA”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: Jiayi Sun, Ohio State University
    Note:

    Discussion paper: TBA



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, October 26, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Speaker 1: Jahmour Givans | Speaker 2: Giovanni Cabass, Speaker 1: Ohio State University | Speaker 2: Member, School of Natural Sciences
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Monday, October 26, 2020
    Princeton University Gravity Initiative Lunch
    “TBA”

    Location: via ZOOM
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Yakov Shlapentokh-Rothman, Princeton University
    https://gravity.princeton.edu/

  • Tuesday, October 27, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Joint Astrophysics Colloquium
    “Using Debris Disks to Trace the Dynamics of Planetary Systems”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Meredith Hughes, Wesleyan University

    Description:

    Debris disks are signposts of mature planetary systems, and resolved images of dust grains act like test particles that trace the dynamics of embedded planets.  I will describe ongoing efforts with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) to learn about the dynamics of planetary systems using signatures imprinted on the dust and gas in debris disks around nearby stars.  In particular, I will discuss how the vertical structure of the disk allows us to measure the prevalence of Uranus and Neptune analogs, how resolving the dust distribution in systems with directly imaged companions can allow us to dynamically measure their masses, and how observations of gas and dust allow us to distinguish between models of planet formation mechanisms.  


    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/joint-iaspu-astrophysics-colloquium

  • Tuesday, October 27, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 12:30 PM

  • Wednesday, October 28, 2020
    University of Pennsylvania Astronomy Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 2:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Koji Mukai, Goddard Space Flight Center
    http://www.physics.upenn.edu/events/astro-seminars

  • Thursday, October 29, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar
    “Dynamics of Local Group Satellite Galaxies in the Era of Precision Astrometry”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Ekta Patel, University of California, Berkeley

    Description:

    High-precision astrometric data from space observatories, such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Gaia, are revolutionizing our ability to study the Local Group. 6D phase space measurements (3-dimensional position and velocity) now make it possible to rewind the clock and trace the orbital histories of nearly half of all Local Group satellites to their cosmic origins in the early Universe. These new datasets pave the way for a revised model of the Local Group’s dynamical history and its current dark matter content. In this talk, I will focus on the Magellanic Clouds and M33, the most massive satellite galaxies orbiting around the MW and M31, respectively. These massive satellites are nearly 10% as massive as their host galaxies and LCDM simulations predict that they too host a population of "ultra-faint” satellite galaxies, i.e. a satellites of satellites hierarchy. In this talk, I will juxtapose these two satellite systems and discuss ongoing efforts to characterize satellites of the Magellanic Clouds and future efforts for finding M33 satellites. Together, these two systems provide a direct test for LCDM predictions at the low mass end and act as as a benchmark for next generation studies of analogous galaxies beyond the Local Group in the era of WFIRST, JWST, and LSST.


    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/astrophysics-seminars

  • Monday, November 2, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “TBA”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: Iryna Butsky , University of Washington
    Note:

    Discussion paper: TBA



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, November 2, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Mehdi Rezaie, Ohio University
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Tuesday, November 3, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Joint Astrophysics Colloquium
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Keith Hawkins, University of Texas, Austin
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/joint-iaspu-astrophysics-colloquium

  • Tuesday, November 3, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 12:30 PM

  • Wednesday, November 4, 2020
    Rutgers University Physics/Astronomy Colloquium
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual
    Time: 10:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Oscar Agertz, Lund University
    Note:

    Please contact administrative assistant Lisa Rivera (lrivera at physics.rutgers.edu) with questions regarding speakers schedule and zoom settings. Questions about the colloquium schedule should be addressed to Prof. Piers Coleman (pcoleman at physics.rutgers.edu).



    Description:

    PLEASE NOTE NEW TIME FOR THIS WEEK ONLY

    Zoom Link: https://rutgers.zoom.us/j/97747524523?pwd=ei9yOGh1WWg4VVJWcDVDVTdJVjNKdz09

    Meeting ID: 977 4752 4523
    Passcode: 817908

     


    https://physics.rutgers.edu/events/colloquium/

  • Wednesday, November 4, 2020
    University of Pennsylvania Astronomy Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 2:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Antonio Montera-Dorta, University of São Paulo
    http://www.physics.upenn.edu/events/astro-seminars

  • Thursday, November 5, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Lam Hui, Columbia University
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/astrophysics-seminars

  • Monday, November 9, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “TBA”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: Wren Suess, University of California, Berkeley
    Note:

    Discussion paper: TBA



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, November 9, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Shengqi Yang, New York University
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Tuesday, November 10, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Joint Astrophysics Colloquium
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Rogier Windhorst, Arizona State University
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/joint-iaspu-astrophysics-colloquium

  • Tuesday, November 10, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 12:30 PM

  • Thursday, November 12, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Barbara Castanheira Endl, Baylor University
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/astrophysics-seminars

  • Monday, November 16, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “TBA”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: TBA
    Note:

    Discussion paper: TBA



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, November 16, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Kate Storey-Fisher, New York University
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Tuesday, November 17, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Joint Astrophysics Colloquium
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Daryl Haggard, McGill University
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/joint-iaspu-astrophysics-colloquium

  • Tuesday, November 17, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 12:30 PM

  • Thursday, November 19, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar
    “Venus: Moment of Inertia and Length of Day”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Jean-Luc Margot, University of California, Los Angeles

    Description:

    Earth-based radar observations in 2006–2019 enable the first measurement of the spin precession rate and moment of inertia of Venus. The observations also show that the spin period of the solid planet changes by tens of minutes. The length-of-day variations are due to variations in atmospheric angular momentum transferred to the solid planet.


    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/astrophysics-seminars

  • Monday, November 23, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “TBA”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: Sinclaire Manning, The University of Texas at Austin
    Note:

    Discussion paper: TBA



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, November 23, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Tuesday, November 24, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Joint Astrophysics Colloquium
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Gianfranco Brunetti, INAF - Institute of Radioastronomy
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/joint-iaspu-astrophysics-colloquium

  • Tuesday, November 24, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 12:30 PM

  • Monday, November 30, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “TBA”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: TBA
    Note:

    Discussion paper: TBA



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, November 30, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Nastassia Grimm, University of Zurich
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Tuesday, December 1, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Joint Astrophysics Colloquium
    “Structure and dynamics of the solar corona from within: the NASA Parker Solar Probe mission at 20 solar radii”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Stuart Bale, University of California, Berkeley
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/joint-iaspu-astrophysics-colloquium

  • Tuesday, December 1, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Virtual Event
    Time: 12:30 PM

  • Thursday, December 3, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar
    “Physics of Enigmatic Fast Radio Bursts”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Tsevi Mazeh, Tel Aviv University
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/astrophysics-seminars

  • Monday, December 7, 2020
    Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]
    “Towards a direct measure of the Galactic acceleration”

    Location: Remote via Zoom
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Discussion Leader: Sukanya Chakrabarti, Rochester Institute of Technology; Member, School of Natural Sciences
    Note:

    Discussion paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.15097



    Description:

    Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.
     
    During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is projected onto a large screen, and a guest explains the paper, section by section, in greater detail than may be explained within the text of the article. To aid with discussion, only the article PDF is presented -- no powerpoint-style slides. Galread discussions are very friendly and interactive.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/galread

  • Monday, December 7, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Thursday, December 10, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Virtual Meeting
    Time: 11:00 AM
    Speaker(s): Pawan Kumar, The University of Texas at Austin
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/astrophysics/astrophysics-seminars

  • Monday, December 14, 2020
    Institute for Advanced Study/Princeton University Early Universe/Cosmology Lunch Discussion

    Location: Until further notice, meetings will be held remotely on Zoom.
    Time: 12:30 PM
    Note:

    Contact Andrina Nicola or <anicola AT princeton.edu> or Marcel Schmittfull <mschmittfull AT ias.edu> for the Zoom link. Organizers are Jo Dunkley, Princeton University, and Matias Zaldarriaga, Institute for Advanced Study.


    https://web.astro.princeton.edu/events/seminars/cosmology-lunch

  • Tuesday, September 7, 2021
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Dilworth Room
    Time: 12:15 PM

  • Tuesday, September 14, 2021
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Dilworth Room
    Time: 12:15 PM

  • Tuesday, September 21, 2021
    Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Bahcall Lunch

    Location: Dilworth Room
    Time: 12:15 PM