Physics Events

  • Monday, November 20, 2017
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “Loops in AdS from Hamiltonian Approach”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Lorenzo Di Pietro, Perimeter Institute

    Description: I will discuss a method to compute 1/N corrections in large N CFTs based on the Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory for the dilatation operator. I will apply the method to the simplest examples, i.e. subsectors of large-N CFTs defined by weakly coupled scalar fields in AdS.  In particular, I will derive the 1/N^2 correction to the single-trace scaling dimension in phi^3 theories, and the 1/N^4 correction to the scaling dimension of (some) double-trace operators in phi^4 theories. When possible, I will compare with existing results obtained with other methods, and I will discuss the flat-space limit of the result.

  • Monday, November 27, 2017
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Andrew Liam Fitzpatrick, Boston University

  • Tuesday, November 28, 2017
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Neal Weiner, New York University

  • Thursday, November 30, 2017
    Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Gilles Tarjus, Laboratory of Theoretical Physics of Condensed Matter of the Pierre et Marie Curie University

  • Friday, December 1, 2017
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 1:45 PM
    Speaker(s): Zohar Komargodski, Stony Brook University

  • Monday, December 4, 2017
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, PCTS Seminar Room, 4th Floor
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Sasha Zhiboedov, Harvard University

  • Tuesday, December 5, 2017
    Quantum Information and Black Holes

    Location: Wolfensohn Hall
    Time: 7:00 AM
    Note: FREE, but REQUIRED REGISTRATION is available online at https://www.sns.ias.edu/quantum-information-workshop-2017/registration
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/quantum-information-workshop-2017

  • Tuesday, December 5, 2017
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Jack Collins, University of Maryland

  • Wednesday, December 6, 2017
    Quantum Information and Black Holes

    Location: Wolfensohn Hall
    Time: 7:00 AM
    Note: FREE, but REQUIRED REGISTRATION is available online at https://www.sns.ias.edu/quantum-information-workshop-2017/registration
    https://www.sns.ias.edu/quantum-information-workshop-2017

  • Thursday, December 7, 2017
    Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “Dipolar Quantum Gases and Liquids”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Tilman Pfau, Universit├Ąt Stuttgart

    Description: Dipolar interactions are fundamentally different from the usual van der Waals forces in real gases. Besides the anisotropy the dipolar interaction is nonlocal and as such allows for self organized structure formation. Candidates for dipolar species are polar molecules, Rydberg atoms and magnetic atoms. More than ten years ago the first dipolar effects in a quantum gas were observed in an ultracold Chromium gas. By the use of a Feshbach resonance a purely dipolar quantum gas was observed three years after. By now dipolar interaction effects have been observed in lattices and also for polar molecules. Recently it became possible to study degenerate gases of lanthanide atoms among which one finds the most magnetic atoms. The recent observation of their collisional properties includes the emergence of quantum chaos and very broad resonances. Similar to the Rosensweig instability in classical magnetic ferrofluids self-organized structure formation was expected. In our experiments with quantum gases of Dysprosium atoms we could recently observe the formation of a droplet crystal (see figure). In contrast to theoretical mean field based predictions the superfluid droplets did not collapse. We find that this unexpected stability is due to beyond meanfield quantum corrections of the Lee-Huang-Yang type. We observe and study self-bound droplets which can interfere with each other. These droplets are 100 million times less dense than liquid helium droplets and open new perspectives as a truly isolated quantum system.

  • Monday, December 11, 2017
    High Energy Theory Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Bloomberg Lecture Hall
    Time: 2:30 PM
    Speaker(s): Kurt Hinterbichler, Case Western Reserve University

    Description:
     

  • Tuesday, December 12, 2017
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Graham Govanetti, Princeton University

  • Thursday, December 14, 2017
    Hamilton Colloquium Series
    “Exploring Embryonic Patterning with Colonies of Human Embryonic Stem Cells”

    Location: Jadwin Hall, Room A10
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Eric Siggia, Rockefeller University

    Description: Embryology at the beginning of the 21st century finds itself in a situation similar to neurobiology; the behavior of the component pieces is understood in some detail, but how they self-assemble to become life is still very hazy. There are hundreds of  molecules that enable cell communication and genetics defines their function by classifying aberrant embryos at a suitable intermediate stage of development, which is difficult for mammals and impossible for humans. Embryonic stem cells can be expanded indefinitely and in the context of the embryo give rise to all cells in the body. The colloquium will describe synthetic systems that coax these stem cells to recapitulate aspects of gastrulation, which is the process by which the embryo transforms from a sphere to a cylinder, builds its anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes, and segregates cells into ectoderm (skin and neurons), mesoderm (muscle bones and blood), and endoderm (gut, lungs, pancreas, etc.) lineages.

  • Thursday, December 14, 2017
    Raymond and Beverly Sackler Lecture in Astrophysics
    “Fast Radio Bursts”

    Location: McDonnell A02
    Time: 8:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Victoria Kaspi, McGill University

    Description: In 2007, astronomers discovered a new mysterious cosmic phenomenon: Fast Radio Bursts. These events consist of short, intense blasts of radio waves arriving from far outside our Milky Way galaxy. Their origin is unknown, however Fast Radio Bursts appear ubiquitous in our Universe, with roughly 1000 arriving every day over the full sky. I will discuss the Fast Radio Burst mystery and what is presently known about it, and describe a revolutionary new radio telescope being built in Canada that will soon enable astronomers worldwide to make major progress in our understanding of the FRB puzzle.

  • Tuesday, January 16, 2018
    Pheno & Vino Seminar
    “TBA”

    Location: Jadwin Hal, Room 303
    Time: 4:00 PM
    Speaker(s): Kohsaku Tobioka, Stony Brook University